The Best Bass Headphones in 2017 – The complete guide

the best bass headphones

Next time a purist audiophile goes ballistic on your bassy taste in music, let them know that your brain is wired right. Yes, bass is easier and more enjoyable to pick up for the brain. No wonder so many headphones emphasize bass more than any other part of the frequency. But the beauty of bass lies in both quantity and quality. Over-hyped bass with fewer details just sounds boomy. This is what differentiates the good bass headphones from flashy ones. Since we could make the distinction, we picked the 20 best bass headphones that can balance both. We focused on plenty of bass and how it rounded up with the rest of audio response. We have covered a large price range of on-ear and over-ear headphones that we know bass-heads are spread across, and have also reviewed bass earbuds / in-ear headphones.

How are bass headphones different from conventional headphones?

As per audiophile standards, a good headphone should aim at a neutral audio response. None of the three categories of audio response: bass, mids and highs should be boosted. However, most headphones have a V or a U-shaped response. They emphasize on bass and treble a little more than mids. Bass is usually the easiest part of the spectrum to boost. And a slight bump in bass makes the song sound more energetic especially if it’s dance music or hip-hop.

The audio response of a neutral headphone is like a blank canvas. Using an equalizer, you can boost any part of the frequency. So you can get a neutral headphone and kick up the bass to your taste. But EQ’ing music on each player might be tiresome. If your favorite sound is the low, deep bassline why not just buy bassy headphones. These are headphones that have bass turned up a notch. These are available in a range of bass boost, right from a low enjoyable warmth like the Audio-Technica M50x to outright riot like the Skullcandy Crusher. Based on what kind of bass you like and in what amount, you can take your pick out of our best bass headphones list.

How do I get more bass out of my headphones?

Yes, it’s possible to get better sound from the headphones you already have. But right from the process of selecting a new headphone, you can make sure you get enough bass by:

  • Sound Signature: Instead of looking for just the best headphones in the market, look for the best headphones with the sound signature you prefer. If you are a bass-head, go for bass headphones that focus on delivering quality low-end power.
  • Position: Don’t just plop the headphones on your head. When you first put them on, move them around a little bit until you find a balance in comfort and audio. Play a bassy song. You know you have found the best position when the bassline is heard loud and clear.
  • Velour pads: Not only are velour earpads ridiculously soft and comfortable, they give your ears a nice seal. And better seal always results in better bass performance. It also suppresses the ambient noise. You automatically hear the details and the deep bass undercurrent better without the noise.
  • Amplifiers: If you are a real music-lover and you need to hear the details just right, an audio amplifier will come in handy. It surges more power through the music. But do note that the amplifier only amplifies the source audio. So use good quality audio files.
  • Audio Files: Manufacturers are using everything at their disposal to depict the audio exactly as the music players plays it. So it can only bring out the details that the audio file has to offer. Chuck the mp3 and switch to FLAC and WMA for your favorite tracks.
  • Equalizer: The best way to get the bass going is to equalize the music. You may have Equalizer settings in the music player of your device itself. Or you can download an Android or iPhone Equalizer app. Alter the levels of lower frequencies for better bass.

Why do people love bass?

It’s biological. It has been proved by a conclusive study at McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind. They checked how their brains responded to the low- and high-pitched tones. The participants were made to listen to tones and tap their fingers accordingly and tap their fingers along with it.  Off-rhythm mistakes were deliberately introduced. The participants seemed to react strongly to lower tones.

So it follows that our brains are wired to pick up bass notes easier. A lower pitched instrument carrying the beat gets better response from the human brain. So no, you don’t have poor taste for choosing bass. You are just exercising your human tendencies. Even the human brain sends low frequency electrical pulses to function properly.

The key features of high quality bass headphones 

Very few headphones go with the label ‘extra bass headphones’ in their title. And even those need to be taken with a grain of salt. So we scouted for and picked the 10 best bass headphones based on:

Audio: Wait, not just bass? No, because bass alone cannot carry the entire audio. What’s the point of bass if Jay-Z seems to be mumbling through the entire song? We checked for the bass performance of headphones that ties in nicely with the mids and highs. Mids will sound recessed in the bass headphones mostly. But we picked headphones that cause minimal damage to mids.

Amount of bass: We focused on how much bass the best bass headphones have. We covered headphones with warm, exciting bass to outrageously powerful bass. Some of the headphones also offer variable bass which allows you to pick your poison. Bass-light and purist neutral headphones were ignored.

Comfort: To really enjoy headphones, they should sit comfortably on your head. They should not apply unbearable pressure on your ears. The headband should stretch over your head. The earpads should be designed to minimize sweating on ears. The best bass headphones were selected out of such a pool.

Budget: Bass-head budgets are spread over a large price range. So our list for the best bass headphones has something for everyone. Headphones from different price ranges were compared based on their value for money, not their absolute price.

Features: The best bass headphones may have any other useful features like noise-cancellation, Bluetooth connectivity, removable cables, removable earpads, foldability etc. Each of these features also added brownie points in their column.

Looks: Bass-heads usually require their headphones to look and sing the bass power. So for the best bass headphones, we chose cans that look great too. From funky headphones with tribal colors to bold stylish designs, we have all varieties for you.

Top 20 Best Bass Headphones in 2017 – Chart

Picture

Name Feature Price

Rating

Picture

Name Feature Price

Rating

  1. V-MODA Crossfade M-100 Over-Ear Noise-Isolating Metal Headphone  Clean deep Bass, Vivid Mids and Ultra-Extended Highs $$$ 4.4 
  2. JVC Real Sound System Z Series HA-SZ2000 Stream Woofer DB Headphones  Vibration inhibiting cylinder made of brass $$ 4.4 
  3. Fostex T50RP MK3 Professional Studio Headphones  Low repulsion ear pad and head pad for maximum comfort $$ 4.4 
  4. Beyerdynamic DT 770 Pro 80 ohm Limited Edition Professional Studio Headphones  Superb sound reproduction across all frequencies $$  4.4
  5. Sennheiser HD 8 DJ Headphones  High SPL capability (115dB) and ambient noise isolation  $$$ 4.4 
  6. Skullcandy Crusher Headphones  Sensation55 Driver $$  4.4
  7. Sony XB950B1 Extra Bass Wireless Headphones with App Control, Black (2017 model)  Enjoy broad frequency response $$ 4.2 
  8. Audio-Technica ATH-PRO700MK2 Professional DJ Monitor Headphones  53 mm drivers designed exclusively for PRO700MK2 $$ 4.1 
  9. V-MODA Crossfade LP2 Vocal Limited Edition Over-Ear Noise-Isolating Metal Headphone  Two 50 mm dual-diaphragm drivers $$  4.0
  10. Denon AH-D600 Music Maniac Over-Ear Headphones  50mm Free Edge Nano Fiber Driver $$$ 4.0 
  11. Bluedio T3 (Turbine 3rd) Extra Bass Wireless Bluetooth 4.1 Stereo Headphones  Condenser Microphone with a sensitivity of -42dB $$ 4.0 
  12. Ultrasone PRO 900 S-Logic Surround Sound Professional Closed-back Headphones  Impedance 40 ohm $$$ 4.0 
  13. AKG K550 Closed-Back Reference Class Headphone  50mm driver size for high output and detailed low frequencies $$ 4.0 
  14. Symphonized Wraith 2.0 Bluetooth Genuine Wood Wireless Headphones  Wraith Wireless headphones maximum comfort and noise isolation $$ 4.0 
  15. Sony MDR10R Hi-Res Stereo Wired Headphones  Enjoy extended comfort Swivel function for improved portability $$ 4.0 
  16. Beats Solo3 Wireless On-Ear Headphones  Adjustable fit with comfort-cushioned ear cups made for everyday use $$ 4.0 
  17. Sony MDRXB450AP Extra Bass Smartphone Headset  30 mm drivers for wide frequency response $$ 4.0 
  18. Panasonic Quick-Fit Over-the-Ear DJ Stereo Monitor Headphones RP-HTF600-S  Rich bass and natural treble with 50mm neodymium drivers $$ 4.0 
  19. JVC HASR50X XX Xtreme Bass Headset  Robust body with anti-impact $$ 3.8 
  20. Pioneer Pro DJ HDJ-2000MK2-K DJ Headphone  Rotatable housing $$$ 3.7 
  1. V-MODA Crossfade M-100 Over-Ear Noise-Isolating Metal Headphone

V-Moda is a maverick at combining bold style with bold sound. Their M100 bass headphones are their masterpieces just as Val Kolton, the CEO imagined their headphones to be. The grungy industrial design along with the hulk-ish durability is the best in the industry. The bass sizzles in maximum quantity without disturbing the overall quality of audio. The accessory pack is a big advantage too. And if you have a taste for customization, V-Moda has some suave styles to offer. V-Moda M100 is a complete package of what a bass-head thinks of when she/he imagines the best bass headphones.

Design and Features

Crossfade M100 bass headphones have the trademark design that became synonymous with V-Moda headphones. The unmistakable hexagonal earcups make an impression of power just as the audio does with bass. V-Moda uses the top materials to create this piece of art. The metal plates at the back of the earcups are made of aircraft-grade material. The earcups are loaded with replaceable memory foam pads which adapts to the shape of your ears after a while. Padding is then draped in leather. Only major complaint about the V-Moda design is how these earpads get a tad uncomfortable after long hours of wearing for large ears. There’s an easy solution though. You can replace the pads for XL-sized earpads which are easier on ears.

The SteelFlex contortionist band of these bass headphones can be flattened up to 10+ times. V-Moda also claims that the M100s can survive concrete drops more than 70 times. The band is slim and suits all head shapes. The Swiss-style hinges from which the ear pieces hang are designed such that both earcups can fold inwards. The M100 headphones have a detachable cable. Both the earcups have a 3.5mm port each but you need to connect to only one side at a time. They come with a SpeakEasy mic cable with a single button remote. Alternatively, you also get a SharePlay audio cable which can be used to daisy chain headphones and share music. Both cables are Kevlar-reinforced for extra durability.

The M100 bass headphones come with V-corks to cork shut the 3.5mm port which is not being used. That’s how meticulous these folks are. You also get a compact exoskeleton case with a strap to hold the headphones down. A carabiner clip is provided to hang it off the back of your bag. These cans have been tested for durability by military standards. They are capable of withstanding moisture, heat, salt spray and UV rays but we would rather not test these.

You get 3D print custom shield kits as an optional paid accessory. With this you can laser engrave your logo on the metal backplate of the earcups or switch them out for better designs. You can also opt for 3-button cable, coiled cable or BoomPro mic for gamers and Skype.

Audio

The sound signature of the V-Moda M100 bass headphones bustles with a richness and depth. The bass is obviously boosted here to match a bass-head’s taste.  But V-Moda does this without sounding boomy or crass. It toes the fine line between boisterous bass. They pack a 50-mm driver which creates a rich and dynamic audio signature. The lower end of their frequency response matches our demands of quality and quantity. The bassline is clean in spite of the obvious bump in bass. M-100 does bass even better than our all-time favorites Sennheiser Momentum 2.0. The latter tend toward a warm transparent sound while M100s aims for layered strong audio that can shake you up. The sub-bass receives a thunderous presence. But the bass isn’t boomy or distorted at high volumes. And it’s substantial at low volumes.

These bass headphones have only slightly recessed mids. A casual listener will notice it only on very close inspection with clearer cans like Momentum 2.0. But what you lose in midrange presentation, M100 makes up in entertainment value. Vocals and guitars sound warm and alive. The treble is smooth. It’s not bumped enough to grate on your ears. The passive noise isolation of XL earpads helps in making M100’s bass sound even better.

The soundstage of M100 is wide enough to accommodate its feisty audio. With the XL pads it sounds even more expansive.

Pros:

  • Clean but bold, powerful bass
  • Beautiful and highly durable design
  • Removable earpads
  • Great bunch of accessories
  • Optional customization kits and accessories
  • Foldable
  • Lightweight for the features

Cons:

  • Needs XL earpads for comfort

 

  1. JVC Real Sound System Z Series HA-SZ2000 Stream Woofer DB Headphones

If brutal bass is your style, then JVC HA-SZ2000 bass headphones would be your jive. These are for the true bassheads who like low end to nauseating levels. Designed with quad drivers, these cans have a powerful sound signature. These are moderate-weight headphones which can be tamed for everyday use with some comfy earpads. Prepped with the right kind of DAC and amplifier, these bass cannons are for the serious dabblers in music critiquing. These are the best bass headphones as far bass power is required.

Design and Features

The JVC HA-SZ2000 bass headphones keep the design simple and smart. They don’t have any flashy design quirks like the Sennheisers or Sony cans.  They are simple blacks and they look a little beefy. They have large round earcups connected to a broad headband. The band is padded for convenience. The earpads are plush and draped with synthetic leather. But most users agree that the earpads are the worst design element. They feel uncomfortable. Fortunately, they are removable. Switching them out for different pads like HAM55X solves any remaining comfort issues that the headphones have. The arms of the headband fold into a compact shape.

These bass headphones have permanently fixed cable. While we resent that the cable cannot be detached, we are thankful that it is attached to only one side. The cable runs 3.5 feet long. You can use an extension to reach the DAC or amplifier. The build quality is excellent. Durability is unlikely to be an issue. They come with a soft carry pouch.

Audio

JVC HA-SZ2000 bass headphones sound like little subwoofers inside your ears. The out-of-box experience may throw you a little bit. Letting them burn in and replacing the pads really makes them open up. Once they achieve their true colors, they are impossible to put down. They pack 4 drivers in total. There are two 55mm drivers in the back for sub bass while 33mm driver in the front handle the mids and highs. You will have to use EQ and amps judiciously to get the full blast of these headphones. Which is why they are more of an indulgence than an accessory.

The low end of these JVC bass headphones are the most vigorous notes we have ever head. They will truly shake your core. But bass is very clean and impossibly tight for such punch. Bumping the frequencies below 80 Hz will get the sub-bass in action too. Do not push the bass spectrum at 80Hz and above or else you will be forced to bury your head under the sand. The bass doesn’t distort no matter how high you push the volume. This is an extremely rare combination of quality and quantity in bass.

The mids are only slightly recessed in the SZ2K bass headphones. They sound clean with decent details. The midrange does not have the audiophile level transparence that Sennheiser Momentum 2.0 have. But these are exclusive bass headphones. The treble is active but smooth. It does not rise shrilly with the exciting bass. It is free of sibilance but it has some slight sizzle to it. The treble detailing is also good for a bass cannon.

With the right oversized pads you see the soundstage opens up. It is competitive for a closed-back headphone. You get a lot of headroom while listening to bassy music. And that suffices.

Pros:

  • Unbelievable bass paunchiness
  • Tight and distortion-free bass
  • Foldable
  • Comfortable once earpads are changed
  • Durable build
  • Mids are only slightly veiled

Cons:

  • Stock earpads need to be replaced
  • Cable is permanently attached

 

  1. Fostex T50RP MK3 Professional Studio Headphones

Fostex T50RP MK3 bass headphones are semi-open cans that beat bass like the pro they are. The design strikes a balance between bass response and an open audio. These are revealing headphones which allow you to enjoy the details of you music. The glorious bass pumps with authority but within the limits of the bass frequencies. The physical package is sturdy and good for both studio and office use. The bang huge for bucks, hence their top place in the best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

The Fostex T50RP MK3 bass headphones channel the spirit of minimalism in their design. They have a glossy body done entirely in black. The broad but thin headband is covered in light padding and pleather. The earcups are racetrack-oval and dangle on metal posts. They can be moved up or down the posts for adjustment. So they fit people in a large range of head sizes. The earpads are fortunately removable. We suggest switching them out for velour pads for extended comfort and better seal. Brainwavz HM5 pads are a good option. The memory foam in these pads helps them settle down comfortably on the ears. The headband clamp is only enough to keep the headphones on. The earcups revolve a few degrees towards the sides to adapt to your head.

The pleather used in these bass headphones is of above average quality, so they remain durable for the price. They have detachable cables, a major feature missing in the JVC SZ2000 headphones. They come with two cables: a 10-feet black cable ending in 6.3mm jack and an orange 4 feet cable ending in 3.5mm jack. The cables connect to the earcups at a 3.5mm port with a proprietary locking mechanism. But they are easily replaceable. There are no extras in the package except the headphones and cables. A carry case would have been much appreciated.

Audio

The Fostex T50RP MK3 bass headphones are difficult to drive from a normal portable source like a smartphone. You will not feel the full blast of the volume. However, once you connect a portable amp the audio soars in quantity and reveals the true quality. Bass response is impressive straight from the sub-bass frequencies. The T50RP drives deep into the lower frequencies with a slamming impact. It smoothly glides into these frequencies where M50x struggles. The bass attack is also instant which allows them to handle complicated music effortlessly. The bass doesn’t get boomy even at ear-splitting volumes. It’s a marvel how they can produce such powerful bass without bleeding into mids.

The midrange is crystal clear. It is slightly recessed compared to the bass and treble. But these bass headphones are pretty neutral compared to other cans on the list. The vocals and guitars play with depth and excellent details. The treble is highly detailed and transparent. All the frequencies are fast and capable of handling sophisticated mix of instruments without muddying the details. There is no sibilance but treble have just the right bit of sizzle.

The entire image is set in a massive soundstage. The presentation of the T5RP bass headphones sounds very real. The instrument separation is spot-on and spacious. Each note gets its space to breathe and make an impact.

Pros:

  • Deep, impactful sub-bass
  • Tight and fast bass
  • Massive soundstage
  • Clean and clear mids/treble
  • Excellent detailing
  • Detachable cables
  • Removable earpads
  • Excellent audio for the price

Cons:

  • Stock earpads are uncomfortable
  • Needs 20-30% more power to drive

 

  1. Beyerdynamic DT 770 Pro 80 ohm Limited Edition Professional Studio Headphones

The Beyerdynamic DT 770 Pro bass headphones have been around for more than a decade and for good reason. The DT 770 is available in 3 versions with different resistances. But the 80 Ohm version wins the bass game hands down. Not only are they ridiculously comfortable, they pack solid detailing and paunchiness in the bass frequencies. The wide imaging of instruments and the expansive soundstage create a 3D listening experience. We couldn’t have a more specialized option for the best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

The Beyerdynamic DT 770 80Ohm bass headphones look handsome in their build. These are entirely matte black. The round earcups are loaded with velour earpads. The velour earpads are soft like velvet and they provide an excellent seal on the ears. The headband is only moderately broad but padded plushly. They do leak audio so be careful about playing them in public places. The earcups swing forward to adapt to the shape of your head. The clamping pressure is just right to keep the headphones held upright. But it does not cause any discomfort to the ears.

These bass headphones have a permanently fixed cable. Luckily it’s almost 10 feet long so you can connect it to an amp or a DAC easily. And it connects only to one earcup so you get enough flexibility to move your head as you please. The cable terminates in a 3.5mm jack. A 6.3mm adapter is supplied with the pack. The headphones are built like a tank but they only weigh 9.5 ounces. The impedance is not so high that you would require an amp to drive these headphones. They can be operated with the portable music players like smartphone without an amp.

Audio

With a bit of EQ, the Beyerdynamic DT 770 80 Ohm bass headphones can rock your world. The bass is punchy here. You can clearly hear the oomph with which bass and sub-bass frequencies beat. DT 770 also impresses us with the quality of bass. It is clean and tightly controlled. It does not dominate other frequencies or claim attention over mids. You have the opportunity to crank up the bass without it sounding boomy or grainy. The bass remains impactful consistently through all genres of songs. The 80 Ohm model would be the basshead’s choice over the less detailed 32Ohm version or the pricier more balanced 250Ohm version.

These bass headphones have a V-shaped frequency response. The treble is bright and has a bit of bite to it. Some people find this quality intriguing along with the strong bass. But the highs are detailed and well-composed. The mids sound great for a bass headphone. They are clean and detailed though not an intricately as the M50x. One area where the DT 770 has M50x beat is the soundstage. The expansive soundstage of DT770 is simply better than what’s expected of a closed-back headphone. In fact, people have used them for gaming and thoroughly enjoyed the experience.

Pros:

  • Tight bass that beats with gusto
  • Clear mids and detailed highs
  • Deep natural sub-bass
  • Velour earpads
  • Comfortable for continuous use
  • Durable

Cons:

  • Permanently attached cable

 

  1. Sennheiser HD 8 DJ Headphones

Sennheiser HD8 bass headphones are top-of-the-line DJ cans that play a mean game of bass. They have all the usual convenience features that Sennheiser headphones are known for. They are comfortable and as lightweight as they can be with the driver design. Huge favors like detachable cable and foldability make life easier for a DJ with these cans. They are expensive but they deserve the price they quote. Wild horses couldn’t have kept them out of the best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

The Sennheiser HD8 bass headphones have the subtle classy touch that’s trademark to this band. They have chunky racetrack oval earcups that are large enough to cover ears of all sizes. The attached earpads draped in synthetic leather can be switched out for the soft velour earpads that are shipped extra with them. Both earpads give you excellent noise isolation. Their plastic build is reinforced with metal in all the strategic places which makes them absurdly durable. The earcups swivel 210° and lock so you can find a comfortable listening position during DJing. The headband is also padded. They are quite comfortable to wear.

The ear pieces of these bass headphones fold inwards to reduce their footprint almost by half. DJs would appreciate this feature because it makes them more portable. Two removable cables are included with the HD8. One is a 3m straight cable and another is a 10feet coiled cable. Both attach to the either one of the earcups using a proprietary locking mechanism. One noteworthy feature of HD8 is the notifying click while adjusting the headband. This allows you to fix both sides at the same height, a feature missing in the Fostex T50RP. A zippered hard case if provided with the pack.

Audio

Sennheiser is known for insane balance in their songs. But they indulge in guilty pleasure with the HD8 bass headphones. The bass is intricately crafted with a definite dominance over the other frequencies. But somehow Sennheiser manages to offer the same clarity across the frequency response as their balanced headphones. In every song which demands to reach out deep into the sub-bass realm, HD8 delivers. The driver housing prevent too much vibration so you can focus on the music. The bass detailing is impressive at the price with all the other perks. There’s no boominess in bass no matter how far you push it.

The midrange of these bass headphones is clean but slightly veiled because of the bass. The vocals are clear and ringing though. The treble and midrange sound smooth. All instruments sound natural and no frequency feels sculpted. The soundstage is wide and instruments have been separated well. Instruments in complex songs get plenty of space to express themselves well. The audio detailing is good for the price, though not as revealing as the Momentum 2.0.

Pros:

  • Natural sounding bass-boost
  • Clear audio set in wide soundstage
  • Extra Velour earpads supplied
  • 2 detachable cables
  • Earcup rotates for single-ear monitoring
  • Foldable

Cons:

  • None

 

  1. Skullcandy Crusher Headphones

Skullcandy Crusher bass headphones are a dream for the bass-head on a small budget. Their variable bass slider gives you an opportunity to go from balanced bass to vomit-inducing bass levels. The design is durable within the limits of its price. Add to it detachable cable and comfort, you have more than you expect at the price. Crusher aren’t exactly for the audiophile bass-heads. But they offer decent quality with quantity. They perform well enough to be on our best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

The Skullcandy Crusher bass headphones reflect the funky style of the brand. The branding is subtle but repeated all over the body. The build is mostly plastic but it’s pretty durable. It comes with a soft pouch but we would suggest storing them in a case of possible. The arms of the headband fold, so a hard case would be very compact. The earcups are racetrack oval on these cans. They are lavishly padded. The headband clamp is moderate. So we could put them on for 1-2 hours continuously without any pain in the ears. The underside of headband also has cushions that make soft contact with the head.

These bass headphones have a battery compartment under the right earpad where you can fit an AA battery. This powers the amp which converts to the bass slider. The slider is simple to operate and it doubles as a power switch for variable bass. When it’s off the headphones don’t draw power. At maximum bass setting, one battery lasts through 40 hours. Pausing the headphone or disconnecting the cable also powers down the amp automatically. The Crusher comes with a detachable cable with single-button inline remote and mic. It is available in 14 colors.

Audio

Skullcandy is infamous for its bass. With the Crusher bass headphones, this quality is actually valued in our best bass headphones list. Apart from the regular drivers, they have two special subwoofer drivers built in. Even with the bass slider off, these headphones have boosted bass. Like most headphones in this price range, the give the low-end a leg up. In the seriously bassy tracks we suggest that you don’t turn up the bass beyond 50%. Within 0-50% the bass leans ominously towards distortion but it never really gets there. Skullcandy also encourages vibration in the headphones which rock your head.

Bass detailing is good. Sub-bass reach is limited but we can’t blame Skullcandy at this price. Non-audiophile bass-heads may even like the boisterous bass that Crusher bass headphones offer. With each genre, you need to figure out which bass setting suits you best. It takes a few tries to get to the right setting of bass. We never had to touch the bass levels because the audio signature is good enough without the amp.

Pros:

  • Variable bass slider
  • Bumped bass without any distortion
  • Affordable
  • Detachable cable
  • Comfortable earpads

Cons:

  • Bass boost goes unnecessarily high

 

  1. Sony XB950B1 Extra Bass Wireless Headphones with App Control, Black (2017 model)

Sony XB950B1 bass headphones are the ultimate cans if you want your skulls to rattle with the impact. Being wireless is a serious perk they bring to the table. Improving from their previous models, these cans have upgraded their audio and wireless performance. Comfort and style have become a way of life with Sony and XB950B1 is built from the same mold. The sound optimization settings from smartphones ultimately convinced us to put them on the best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

Sony XB950B1 bass headphones are gorgeous specimens. They have the usual chunky architecture that is nevertheless classy. The color has a muted metallic shine all across. The headband is broad but slim. The earcups are round and capable of bending forward toward the ears. The earcups also fold flat. The earcups are padded plushly and draped in leather. The arms of the headband fold reducing them into a compact shape. The construction is majorly plastic but reinforced with metal along the extension sliders. They come in black, blue and stunning red colors.

These bass headphones operate via Bluetooth or NFC. NFC allows you to connect with a single tap with another NFC-enabled device. They also have built-in LDAC enhanced codec. All the required buttons are on the bottom of the earcups. This includes a ‘Bass Boost’ button. Sony has devised a clever way to build flexibility into this option. You can download the Sony companion app. Here you can set bass between -10 to +10. You can also set the audio effects you find on the app. This profile is saved and loaded on to the headphones when you switch the bass boost on.

The battery lasts through 18 hours. The XB950B1 have a 3.5mm port for functioning in the passive made when battery dies.

Audio

Sony has always been on point about balanced neutral audio. But they have recently added multiple line-ups of bass-heavy headphones. While purist audiophiles will be appalled at the bass of XB950B1 bass headphones, bass-heads will rejoice at their sound signature. The bass is tastefully bumped even without the Boost turned on. There’s a punchy low end that has been bumped in the mid-bass region. Bass Boost at high settings is simply distorted so we didn’t use them. With the Surround Sound setting at zero bass boost, the audio opened up reasonably well.

The midrange and treble are smooth. They have decent detailing. Highs roll off fast without introducing any bite in the tracks. Many bass-heads prefer this. Taking the bass to negative levels allows you to focus on mids more.

Pros:

  • Variable bass boost
  • Bluetooth and NFC-enabled
  • Audio effects
  • Bumped bass without any distortion
  • Affordable
  • Good battery life

Cons:

  • Bass boost goes unnecessarily high

 

  1. Audio-Technica ATH-PRO700MK2 Professional DJ Monitor Headphones

Audio-Technica has a knack for impeccable sound. It’s almost with mischievous delight we checked out their ATH-PRO700MK2 DJ bass headphones. They have a simple design and focus on the quality of audio. The bass rises to the occasion even above the M50x headphones. They have excellent isolation meant for the DJing in peace. Detachable cables complete the package to land them in the best bass headphones list.

 Design and Features

Audio-Technica PRO700MK2 bass headphones look utilitarian in design. But we love how compact it’s looks on our head. The build is mostly durable plastic that can take the rough time of DJing gigs. The headband is broad and cushily padded. The earcups are round and loaded with rather shallow earpads. Fortunately you can switch them out with comfy M50 earpads.  The headband has an above-average clamp which might apply pressure on the crown of the head when worn for extended hours. But this is a DJ headphone. The clamp is important to hear well in the noise.

These bass headphones have rotating earcups. They can turn 90° to fold flat and for single-sided monitoring. The arms of the headband pivot and fold the headphones to half their size. The PRO700MK2 comes with two detachable cables. One is a 4feet log straight cable and another is an 8feet long coiled cable. They lock at the headphone with a threaded texture. They come with a 6.3mm adapter and a drawstring leather pouch.

Audio

The AT PRO700MK2 bass headphones strike the most delicate balance between neutral and bassy. It has the most powerful bass we have seen in Audio-Technica headphones, gobs better than the M50. They focused more on the sub-bass than on a mid-bass hump. The amount of bass peddled by these cans is unbelievably high seeing as mids retain their clarity. We do recommend burning them in for a few hours. Some EQ and an amplifier will improve the bass even more. The low end is impactful as bassheads wish.

The midrange is warmed and detailed. Compared to completely neutral headphones, they are only slightly recessed. The treble is also conservative compared to bass. So these bass headphones don’t sound too sculpted. The soundstage is wide and deep. Instrument separation is pretty spacious so PRO700MK” have a field day with complicated music. The stereo image is accurate.

Pros:

  • Powerful bass with sub-bass focus
  • Detachable cable
  • Foldable
  • Earcups fold flat
  • Detailed audio
  • Wide soundstage with excellent instrument separation

Cons:

  • Can get uncomfortable with continuous use

 

  1. V-MODA Crossfade LP2 Vocal Limited Edition Over-Ear Noise-Isolating Metal Headphone

Bass is like home-sweet-home to V-Moda headphones. So it’s not surprising another one from them made to this list. The Crossfade LP2 bass headphones look every bit like the M100. But they have been designed, physically and sonically at a much more affordable price. And they have the typical weapon-grade durability that V-Moda offers. The bass is strong with good detailing across the board. These walked themselves directly to the best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

The Crossfade LP2 bass headphones have the classic high-fashion design of the V-Moda headphones. Most of their build is reinforced by metal parts. The broad headband has slim padding. But it easily supports the hexagonal earcups. The backplate of the earcups is metallic. The earcups are cushioned opulently and comfortable to the ears. In this matter, they are much better than the M100 which need an earpad replacement to get comfortable. The Lp2 do not fold like the M100 headphones.

These bass headphones can stand concrete drops and headband contortion. They are also up for some rough handling. They come with Kevlar-reinforced cables detachable cables. Once is a Speakeasy cable with mic and the other is a simple audio cable. They also ship with an exoskeleton case which packs them away in a small space.  You get a couple of extra metal backplates which can be custom-engraved with your insignia or other dangerous designs. Their earpads are replaceable, so you can switch them for XL pads.

Audio

V-Moda takes pride in their bass performance. The Crossfade LP2 bass headphones have a bass bump that makes the dance genres enjoyable. While it isn’t as tight as the M100 or as deep, it has plenty of sub-bass presence. The bass attack is decent but not as fast as the M100. That being said, for a casual listener, the LP2s show great promise. They have enough detailing and quantity of bass to satisfy such a music-lover. There’s no distortion at high volumes.

These bass headphones have slightly more veiled mids compared to M100 especially if the song is bassy in itself. The treble sizzles, which makes them all the more enjoyable. For a closed-back headphone, it sounds wide and has an appreciably large soundstage. Sound isolation is good.

Pros:

  • Punchy and detailed bass
  • Extremely durable
  • Detachable Kevlar-reinforced cables
  • Replaceable earpads
  • Good haul of accessories

Cons:

  • None

 

  1. Denon AH-D600 Music Maniac Over-Ear Headphones

The Denon AH-D600 bass headphones give the Beats and Monster cans a run for money in terms of looks. But the audio is Denon quality which beats both of them. These burly durable headphones have excellent value for money. Their smooth balanced audio can be EQ’d to bass-heavy and you can reap the benefits of Denon’s detailing. These are highly durable and their funky design matches the modern style. D600 owned a place in the best Denon headphones list as soon as we wore them.

Design and Features

The Denon AH-D600 bass headphones do not stick out from the head. But there’s no denying how large their ear pieces are. To pack the large 50mm Nano Fiber drivers, the earcups have to be large. The outer frame of the headphones is anodized metal. But the drivers sit inside a plastic housing. This creates a nice balance between durability and weight. Pentagonal earcups are designed to sit around the ears rather than on them. They are loaded with oodles of memory foam and draped in faux leather. The contrast stitching on the earpads stand out as a stylish feature. The protein leather is of good quality and feels soft on the ears. These are ‘cloud-fit’ headphones that have little or no clamp.

These bass headphones have detachable cable which connects to both sides. While we wish they were single-sided, we are happy that they detach. They come with one 1.8m cable with 3-button inline mic and remote. For home or studio use, you can opt for the 3m sturdier cable. Both cable divide at the Y-junction to connect to both ears. A 6.3mm adapter and a soft pouch are also shipped with them. D600 are a rare combination of classy and durable. Wearing them in public would need guts especially if you have a small head. They tend to draw attention for their size.

Audio

Denon headphones are well-known in the audiophile circles. The D600 bass headphones try to break the mold of simply balanced audio to clean sound with rumbling bass. They are what a purist might call ‘too bassy’. But for a bass-head they offer detailed bass in heaps. The solid bass performance shows up in genres like hip-hop, EDM etc.. It also gives a nice bass to orchestral and classical music. The D600 essentially make every genre sound fun.

These bass headphones have clear midrange suffused with details. The bass oversteps the mids only in some songs. So even though the bass is boosted, it is still well-controlled. The treble extends well. It’s detailed and sizzling. They sound quite open for a closed-back headphone.

Pros:

  • Warm detailed bass
  • Relatively balanced audio
  • Metal build
  • Funky-looking cans
  • Super-comfortable fit
  • Detachable cables

Cons:

  • Not foldable

 

  1. Bluedio T3 (Turbine 3rd) Extra Bass Wireless Bluetooth 4.1 Stereo Headphones

Bluedio T3 bass headphones are perfect portable gear for the bass-heads. These are stylish, bassy and wireless. These are an accessory you would love to sport on the tube or down the crowded walkways of the city. The compact and handy package can stand the demands of abuse meted out by casual listeners. You can go running with these or use them at home/work. The price wraps them nicely in the package of the best bass headphones.

Design and Features

The Bluedio T3 bass headphones are classy-looking cans considering their low price. Their alloy frame is tough but lightweight. They have a suitably broad headband with padding. The earcups are round. They are loaded with moderate memory foam padding. The headband clamps harder on the head compared to other cans here. This keeps them secure even while you go jogging. The clamp only hurts after an hour or two. The earcups hang off metal joints which is reassuring in terms of durability. The arms of the headband swivel to fold them into a compact size.

These bass headphones use the latest Bluetooth 4.1 technology for wireless connectivity. They have a battery life of 24 hours and 1000 hours on standby. The T3+ version of these headphones have a Micro SD card that can hold your songs. This way you don’t need to connect to a source to play music. They can also be operated in the wired mode when they run out of juice. They are available in 4 glossy colors. They don’t look or feel cheap at all. They bang huge for the price.

The T3 bass headphones also have an in-built mic. You can easily take calls on them in good quality. They are worth the upgrade over T2 headphones. A pinch more money will get you the SD card functionality of T3+. 

Audio

If you hate the T3 bass headphones right out of box, you must either burn them in or switch off the 3D sound option. This can be done by pressing multifunction button and the volume down buttons together. If you are a bass-head who thrives on quantity of bass alone, then let the 3D effect remain. Even without the effect T3 is heavily bassy. The punch really comes to you with the clamp as it shuts the ambient noise down. They might not have the details of Beyerdynamic DT770 but they pack more oomph than what their price demands.

These bass headphones have clean mids. Even with the strong bass, the vocals are present. The treble matches up. It is smoothened out. This keeps them from being sibilant. They also treat the bad quality recordings and formats like mp3 well.

Pros:

  • Inexpensive
  • Expensive-looking build
  • Tonnes of bass
  • Foldable
  • Bluetooth-enabled

Cons:

  • High clamp

 

  1. Ultrasone PRO 900 S-Logic Surround Sound Professional Closed-back Headphones

Ultrasone Pro 900 bass headphones have a quirky sound signature with their S-Logic touch. But the hand of bass is heavy here. These headphones are built like a tank and durable enough for everyday use. Their convenient folding design is compact and highly portable. Detachable cables are another perk. With their Surround Sound effect, they are excellent for movies and gaming.  These are a versatile candidate in the best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

The Ultrasone Pro 900 bass headphones are the built to withstand some serious ill-use.  They weigh around 295g. Although on the heavier side, they don’t feel that way. The reason could be the soft velour earpads. Not only do they feel like velvet and offer a good seal, they uphold the headphones effortlessly on your head. The headband is also padded. The earcups fold flat. The arms of the headband fold to reduce them into a compact package.

These bass headphones come with a spare set of velour earpads. They also have two detachable cables. One is a straight cable ending in 3.5mm jack and the other is a coiled cable ending in 6.3mm jack. They come with a hard zipped carry case that can store the cans and the cables. You can even store your amp here if you like. Ultrasone involves a MU metal bufferboard in their headphone which they claim reduces electromagnetic emissions that affect the ears.

Audio

Ultrasone Pro 900 bass headphones grab your attention with their low-end punch. The bass runs deep into the sub-bass region. It is detailed to the boot. In complicated mixes with sub-bass potential, the Pro 900 handle the bass effortlessly. These are those cans which don’t disappoint you when it comes to hitting the lowest frequencies. The rumble is impactful and satisfying to bassheads. We still wouldn’t recommend them for gentler genres like rock and jazz.

Since both the bass and the treble are feisty in the sound signature of these bass headphones, the midrange sounds slightly recessed. In less bassy songs, the mids do stand out detailed. The treble is detailed and extended. But as with other Ultrasone headphones they have a touch of bite. Some people might call them sibilant while others light the ‘bright’ character of these cans. The soundstage has a good expanse. The S-Logic does give the sound some dimension. Although they are not any more open than other closed-back headphones.

Pros:

  • Powerful detailed bass
  • Exciting treble
  • Comes with 2 sets of velour pads
  • Detachable cables
  • Foldable

Cons:

  • Treble can be sibilant

 

  1. AKG K550 Closed-Back Reference Class Headphone

The AKG K550 bass headphones are for you bass-mixing needs at home or studio.  These cans combine comfort and a warmer version of legendary AKG Q701’s audio. All their features are aimed towards keeping them at home. That’s a shame because their amazing performance makes you want to carry them around. AKG has focused more on the daring bass and overall sound signature than other fancy features. Their clean sound makes them perfect for the best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

The AKG K550 bass headphones look formidable and funny at the same time. They have humongous round ear pieces. They cover the ears completely and sit without any pressure points. The earcups are mounted with plenty of soft foam draped in genuine leather. The headband is broad but slim. The overall profile of the headphones does not stick out of the head. But the diameter of the ear pieces may be difficult to sport in the public. The earcups fold flat.

These bass headphones have a permanently-attached cable. It is rubber-coated to keep it from tangling. The cable is 3m long and ends in a 3.5mm jack. A 6.3mm jack accompanies the package.  The structure of K550 is metal-infused and robust enough for studio and even outside use. But the lack of a carry case and the extra long cable make it less than portable.

Audio

The K550 bass headphones from AKG blow your mind with their wide open presentation. For closed-back headphones they are surprisingly spacious and airy. This is what makes their bass so much more enjoyable. These are warmer than the AKG Q701 headphones. But they are more creative with their bass. They let the low frequencies exert more power and sound relaxed. There’s none of that forced neutrality that usual reference headphones have.

The mids are clean and transparent in these bass headphones. The audio sounds luscious because of the bass element. The treble is well extended into high frequencies. Treble is detailed and clear. All this, set in the massive soundstage, sounds like a live performance. Their sound signature is suited for DJing. The tight fitment gives you excellent noise isolation.

Pros:

  • Bold bass
  • Good noise isolation
  • Extra long cable
  • Ultra comfortable
  • Balanced, natural sound

Cons:

  • Not portable

 

  1. Symphonized Wraith 2.0 Bluetooth Genuine Wood Wireless Headphones

Bass and wood usually mean opposing tastes. Which is why the combination of mellow looks and sly sound offered by the Symphonized Wraith 2.0 bass headphones is special. They have woodwork on the headphones which stands out. The bass-focused audio is punchy without being too aggressive. The Bluetooth connectivity is a blessing in disguise. It makes them portable so you can show off the woodwork. For their high value on money, they deserve a place in the best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

The Symphonized Wraith 2.0 bass headphones may be affordable but their build looks expensive. They earcups are mounted on a metal frame. The ear pieces are round with handcrafted wooden backplates. The ear pieces sit around small ears but will press down on the edges of large ears. The clamp is not too hard but you get excellent noise isolation with these pads. The extensions plate on the headband is marked so that can extend both arms equally. They are available in 6 wood colors.

These bass headphones connect quickly in the wireless mode. You can also use them in the wired mode with the accompanying double-sided cable. Another cable with inline remote is also included in the pack.              They have controls for volume/track navigation, voice commands and call/play/pause at the bottom of the earcups. They come with an earthy-looking drawstring pouch.

Audio

The Symphonized Wraith 2.0 bass headphones jumped into the fray when we heard them. The low, rich bass immediately caught our attention. Sub-bass is decent for the price. It cannot reach the depth that Beyerdynamic 770 has. But for a casual listener there’s plenty of impact. The mid-bass bump has been artfully done. So you end up enjoying all genres of music. The midrange is clear. The vocals and guitar get their space to perform.

The treble seemed a little veiled even after the burn in too. That’s when we saw a minor mod suggested online. You just have to remove the earpads and peel off a thin layer of foam from over the drivers. The treble opens up like magic. The audio response rests in a sizeable soundstage. These are engaging headphones for the price.

Pros:

  • Wooden finish
  • Nice punchy bass
  • Overall enjoyable sound

Cons:

  • Needs small modification for treble to clear up

 

  1. Sony MDR10R Hi-Res Stereo Wired Headphones

For purist audiophile, the good name of Sony was besmirched by the bass MDR10R bass headphones. But we see their potential in the lower frequencies and think that they are a cozy fit for the best bass headphones list. They have all of Sony’s class with some tasteful mid-bass bump. The audiophile outrage has tanked their introductory price. They also have detachable cables completing the package. There’s not much we can ask of the best bass headphones.

Design and Features

The Sony MDR10R bass headphones have guts of metal and we are not kidding. Their aluminum band is lightweight and sturdy. The earcups hangs off a metal arm. They can swivel forward and adapt to your head shape. The earcups are racetrack oval. They are lavishly padded while the headband is moderately padded. The earcups fold flat for compact storage . The earpads easily cover normal and large ears.

These bass headphones have detachable cables. One is a 1.2m audio cable while the other is a 1.2m cable with inline remote. The cords lock with a twisting mechanism at the headphone end. This also makes them proprietary and harder to replace. They come with a semi-hard carry case. They weigh only 6.35 ounces so they sit lightly on the head. The earpads are large enough to offer proper noise isolation in office environments.

Audio

The MDR10R bass headphones from Sony made the mistake of not being from their Extra Bass line. So none of the purists expected its bass. But you have this in-your-face bass performance that truly brings life to the dance genres. It gets overwhelming for a non-bass-head. But Sony hasn’t sacrificed quality over quantity. This is tight and detailed bass. The force of the low-end comes from a prominent mid-bass bump. It makes the music sound energetic and fun.

The midrange sounds veiled next to the bass. But it packs a lot of details for the track where bass is less. The treble opens up to exhibit its details post the burn-in period. It’s not boosted like bass. Treble is smooth and non-sibilant.

Pros:

  • Extremely bassy headphones
  • Detachable cables
  • Metal durable build
  • Lightweight at 6.35 ounces
  • Comfortable

Cons:

  • Needs an amp for high volume

 

  1. Beats Solo3 Wireless On-Ear Headphones

Beats is famous and infamous for their bass. Fortunately in their newer headphones they have learnt to create quality bass in dollops. The Solo3 bass headphones follow this new sound signature. They have the flashy Beats build. Their wireless connectivity is even faster with partner devices from Apple. Their battery life is unbeatable. Like all Beats merchandise, these are expensive. But if you like the high life, these are the best bass headphones for you.

Design and Features

The Beats Solo3 bass headphones follow a similar design as their famous Solo2. The internal frame of the headphones is metal. But the outer finish is all plastic. This balances weight against durability. The headband is only moderately wide. It is padded with a rubber pad at the arch. The earcups are small on-ear type. They sit comfortably on the ear without much clamp. The arms of the headband fold and the headphones come down to a very compact size. The controls for wireless playback are at the back of the earcups.

The most exciting feature of these bass headphones is the in-built Wi chip. It extends the battery life of Solo3 to a whopping 40 hours. You also have a battery meter LED. And it makes it a child’s play to connect to Apple devices. They can also be used in wired mode with the accompanying cable that has smartphone controls. They come in 8 colors.

Audio

The Solo3 bass headphones dole out the bass Beats are famous for. Bass hits hard especially in the bass genes like EDM. The bass attack is fast although not instantaneous. The low-end doesn’t get boomy like with cheap headphones. The bump in bass is quite obvious here. Both electric guitar strings and kick drums get a nice boost. Bass claims the attention here although it doesn’t overwhelm the midrange or treble in most songs.

The midrange is smooth and forgiving on bad recordings. The treble extends well but is likewise toned. The overall sound signature is energetic. We expect more detailing at the price. But Beats is known to be overpriced.

Pros:

  • Big, bold bass
  • Smooth mids and treble
  • Bluetooth enabled
  • 40 hour battery life
  • 8 colors

Cons:

  • Expensive

 

  1. Sony MDRXB450AP Extra Bass Smartphone Headset

The Sony MDRXB450 bass headphones are for bass-heads on a shoe-string budget. Their sleek design is for life on the go. These are lightweight and comfortable for use at home and commute. Their compact design is quite portable. Sony has included as many convenience features as possible at this price. The audio suits the tastes of everyone from casual listener to the bass-lover. These were a lock for the best bass headphones list as soon as we heard them.

Design and Features

The Sony MDRXB450 bass headphones look very sleek. The broad headband doesn’t have any padding. But it’s not uncomfortable. These mount the round earcups. These are on-ear headphones. The earpads rest comfortably on the ears. The clamp is moderate but we still suggest you take them off once in a couple of hours. The earcups fold flat for easy storage and portability.

These bass headphones have permanently-attached cables on both earcups. Fortunately this is a 4feet long flat cable with serrated design which keeps it from getting tangled. It terminates in an L-shaped 3.5mm jack. The cable has a single button inline remote with mic. These are durable cans provided you treat them well. They come in a nice flip case which is slim and handy for travel.

Audio

The Sony MDRXB450 bass headphones are budget-oriented. So they look at bass to spice up their audio. The low-end has a clear bump that forms a nice base for all genres. The bass-specific genres sound enjoyable. The detailing of these frequencies is decent. The bass remains tight for most part. It gets out of hand only in the overtly bassy songs. The midrange and treble are clear. But bass remains the star attraction in these bass headphones.

They are not so bassy that casual listeners will be nauseated. They sound open and clear for their price.

Pros:

  • Inexpensive
  • Plenty of bass
  • Fun, jolly audio
  • Sleek design
  • Tangle-free cable
  • Earcups fold flat

Cons:

  • Double-sided cable permanently attached

 

  1. Panasonic Quick-Fit Over-the-Ear DJ Stereo Monitor Headphones RP-HTF600-S

Panasonic often come up with stylish beautiful-sounding headphones at a low price. HTF600 bass headphones fall into this category. They are more suited for at-home use given the long attached cable. You can use them in the subway provided you braid the wire. They offer excellent value for money. The price ultimately convinced us to lodge them in the best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

The Panasonic HTF600 bass headphones look classy for the price. They are all black with some chrome plating on the backplates. These are not highly durable so we suggest being careful with them. The earcups are racetrack oval and loaded with moderately plush earpads. If you width you can switch them out for velour earpads. But suggest sticking with the stock earpads. They are quite comfortable and they bring out the details in the sound.  You can wear these continuously for 2-3 hours.

These bass headphones have a permanently-fixed cable. Thankfully it is single sided. The cable is 10 feet long and terminates in a 3.5mm jack. The length of the cable makes it possible to hook I up to typical audiophile equipment. HTF600 has the distinction of being the most comfortable headphones in their price range.

Audio

The maturity of Panasonic HTF600 bass headphones in handling the bass is commendable. They have a tiny mid bass bump which considerably spices up the sound. But bass remains tight and controls its bleed into the midrange. With the stock pads the bass sounds relaxing and enough for a casual listener or bass-enthusiast. The bass make the midrange sound rich and meaty. They vocals and guitars sound clear and thick. They are not distorted by bass in any way. The trble has been smoothened to remove the bite.

Pros:

  • High value on money
  • Crisp, tight and bold bass
  • Mature audio signature
  • Comfortable
  • Long cable

Cons:

  • Non-detachable 10-feet long cable

 

  1. JVC HASR50X XX Xtreme Bass Headset

The JVC HASR50X XX bass headphones another value-on-money product in the low price range. Bass-heads may often carry a set of headphones only for commute or only to indulge in the sweet notes of the bass. These are great as a second set. If you are really squashed in your budget, these would be a great option as your go-to bass headset. Their sturdy build and pleasant audio earns them a place in your best bass headphones list.

Design and Features

The JVC HASR50X Xtreme bass headset looks like a tank. The build is mostly plastic but it looks like it could take on anannihilation. These are supra-aural cans. Their round earcups sit on the ears rather than around the ears. They are mounted with plush pads and draped in synthetic leather. The backplate of the earcups has a weapon-grade design with the XX mark of the headphones. These bars serve as shock protectors as well. The earcups are comfy but you might still want to take them off every couple of hours.

The cable connects to both earcups of these bass headphones. In this day and age we prefer the single-sided cable which gives you more flexibility to move your head. But if you are used to earphones, this might not be a problem. The 4feet long cable has an inline mic and single button control. You can use them to make calls on the smartphone.

Audio

We didn’t expect miracles from the HASR50X Xtreme bass headset. But we were pleasantly surprised by the punchy bass. It has good depth and decent amount of details. More importantly it doesn’t sound very boomy. At normal volumes, you won’t see any distortion either. For all the bass-heavy genres, these step up their game. The bass is impactful in the vigorous songs. The midrange and treble both have enough presence wherever required. Bass does not consume them.

Pros:

  • Inexpensive
  • Distortion-free bass
  • Clear audio
  • Shock proof

Cons:

  • Double-sided attached cable

 

  1. Pioneer Pro DJ HDJ-2000MK2-K DJ Headphone

The Pioneer Pro DJ HDJ-2000MK2 bass headphones probably didn’t get a lot of limelight because of their high price. But these are the ‘It’ cans if you want DJ-quality bass. Their handsome design is hard to miss even from a distance. They pack up nicely for portability between your DJing gigs. The comfort level allows you to jam for hours continuously. The quality build stands up to the rigors of DJing life. They are all-round qualified to be one of the best DJ headphones.

Design and Features

The Pioneer Pro DJ HDJ-2000MK2 bass headphones look their price. Done in all black with subtle silver highlights, they look attractive. The large round earcups have puffy earpads draped in leather. The earcups are large enough to sit around the ear rather than press painfully on it. The headband fits closely on the head. The arms are foldable and reduce the packing size significantly. They can also be rotated for single-sided listening.

The cables of these bass headphones connect to one earcup. They lock a mini XLR jack. These cables are harder to replace that normal 3.5mm male-male cables. They come with one straight and one coiled cable ending in 3.5mm and 6.3mm jacks respectively. A clamshell zippered hardcase is also supplied where you can fold and store the headphones. They balance premium build with comfort.

Audio

The 50mm drivers of Pioneer Pro DJ HDJ-2000MK2 bass headphones pump out big bass that hits like bass bins in the club. It’s tight bass that doesn’t bleed into the midrange. Instead it adds power within the bass frequencies. And you get the full-tilt impact of the track. This is for the choosy audiophile bass-heads who understand the intricacies of the audio response. The midrange and treble get space to perform with the treble rather than under it. Noise isolation is good in these cans which helps in the noisy club environment.

Pros:

  • Powerful with tight bass
  • Mids and treble have their space
  • Detachable cable
  • Foldable
  • Sturdy and lightweight

Cons:

  • Expensive
  • Mini XLR jack makes cable proprietary

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